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Bruce, Caroline

I'm Supposed to Hate Them, Right?

One of the phenomena of the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries is that of perceived hatred.  It isn't enough, apparently, that we have to put up with the real hatred that exists in our world, we now need to go out looking for hatred and manufacturing it if it doesn't exist.  We are now profiled, and according to our profiles, we are told by society who we hate.  This hatred is assumed.

1. I do not like President Bush.  This makes me anti-American.  It also makes me anti-Christian (see #2). So say the claims.

2. I am, despite #1 above, a conservative, fundamentalist, heterosexual Christian.  This means that I hate any number of people, including but not limited to: gays, Muslims, the poor, basically anyone who doesn't hold the same beliefs I do. So say the claims.

3. I am male. This means I hate women as anything other than slaves or sex objects.  So say the claims.

4. I am white.  This means that I hate absolutely anyone with a different skin color, especially Natives and African-North Americans.  So say the claims.

5. I am an English-speaking Canadian.  This means that I hate French-Canadians, and all my waking hours are spent plotting new ways to suppress them.  So say the claims.

6. I am Canadian.  this means I hate Americans (this on top of my being anti-American back in #1).  So say the claims.

Well, it's amazing I get anything done at all, what with all the time I spent hating everyone so much.  My many American friends, my gay friends, my non-Christian friends, my French-Canadian friends, my friends with other skin colors, my female friends, my poor friends, my rich friends, would probably be as surprised as I am to learn how much I hate them.  In fact, I for one am so surprised, I think I'll keep on not hating them, despite what "they" tell me my feelings are.  Besides, life's too short to hate any of these people, let alone all of them.  Then there's Christ's directive to love our neighbor.  Well, that settles it, then.

Seriously, though, in this modern culture of ours, it's much easier to be a victim because it requires less justification. If you say I hate you because you're an American, you can be indignant, and you really don't have to think about why. On the other hand, if we have a difference of
opinion, this requires dialog, it requires a meeting of the mind. That's a lot harder than simply being indignant. But to those looking to be hated, may I suggest that the harder course of action is infinitely more rewarding? You may never agree, there may be principles which you simply cannot and will not compromise. But to take the easy way out, the way of insisting on being hated, short-changes both of you.

Comments

Here here! Open and honest dialog is the only real way to the solution of problems.